Wilkinson Era Real Estate

Downsizing With Your Pets - Indoor Space

by Mundy Bringuier 10/06/2019

What if your move to downsize doesn't include a yard? Maybe you opted for a small balcony or patio to maximize your living area or community amenities. Whether your outdoor pet is used to a larger yard or your indoor pet is accustomed to a larger house, they'll be transitioning to the new lifestyle at home just as much as you, if not more. Finding ways to help your pet adjust to their new indoor space is just as crucial for their happiness as it is yours. Here are some tips to assist.

Keep them entertained while you’re away. 

You don't want your dog to become bored, and you definitely don't want to come home to a torn apart couch or your dog having marked all over the house. Whatever your financial ability is to invest in entertainment for your dog, there are simple purchases and DIY options for at home entertainment.

  • A room with a view - Make sure there's a space in your home where your dog can see out the window. Being able to observe the goings-on around your house can help stimulate your dog during the day. A window seat is a useful way to allow your dog to see outside, while in a laid down position, keeping them calm and less likely to bark. They can lackadaisically watch the outdoors while lying in a sunbeam.
  • Interactive feeding - Toys that incorporate mental stimulation, and food or treats, can be very effective for your pet, especially small dogs. You can purchase ball toys that slowly dispense kibble as your dog rolls it around the room or make one of your own by poking holes in a PVC pipe, filling it with food and capping the ends. For short stints out of the house filling a hollow ball toy or tube with peanut butter is a great option—for this treat make sure your pet knows the designated area for eating or for food toys, so you keep any stray peanut butter to the kitchen or the dog’s bed and off your couch!
  • Tear-apart Rope Toys - Not all rope toys are created equal. To keep your pup occupied for hours at a time find a tightly woven rope at your local hardware store or purchase a rope toy with small threads tightly woven together. For a dog that loves pulling things apart, a tight weave is crucial. They need to get interested in figuring out how to pick the toy apart and help them stay interested as they see the progress of their meticulous work. Sure, there will be some cleanup of string mess, but your grandmother's afghan (the one with the fringe? Yeah, that one) will be safe.

Prepare for transition before buying. 

If you know you'll have to lose the yard in your move to downsize think about the qualities in a new home or community that will keep life good for your pet. These qualities are especially necessary if your dog is transitioning from being an outdoor pet to a fulltime indoor pet. Check out part three in this series to learn more about the best community features for you and your dog. As always, your trusted real estate agent is here to help you find the best new home for you and your best friend. Talk with them about both of your needs to downsize in the way that works for you.

About the Author
Author

Mundy Bringuier

 

When Buyers ask why I need a REALTOR®, here is my response....... with 19 years of experience. For one thing we have the experience, we know the pit-falls, and we know what to look out for when something doesn’t look right from experience.

A REALTOR® with experience is PRICELESS. A REALTOR® is well worth the money that you don’t pay. We can save you from losing money, there are many things that can go wrong (“Time is of the Essence”) in a contract, which means you make one mistake, miss a date on contract it can cause the contract to be terminated and can lose your Ernest Deposit Money which can be devastated to any buyer especially a first time home buyer.

A REALTOR® job is to protect you to the best of their ability, look out for your best interest, be loyal to you, provide you with all material facts that could influence your decision(s), follow your lawful instructions, keep confidential information confidential and to help you negotiate the best price.

Here are some things you may not be aware of: in just one purchase transaction:

  1. There are nearly 300 communications that takes place between, the seller(s), agents, attorney, lender, inspectors, insurance companies, surveyors, appraisers with emails, text, faxes and phone calls.
  2. Nearly 400 documents/pages, all of which have significant consequences if you don’t fully understand.
  3. Review of documents/Insure accuracy: Offer to Purchase and Contract, HOA documents (covenants & restrictions), Loan package, Addendums, Property Disclosure Statements, Attorney documents, Review the final financial statement (HUD-1) to insure you get every penny that is due you.
  4. Coordinate all events: starting making appointment to show properties, home and termite inspections, surveyors, appraisers, repairs to be done, closings. The list goes on of probable unforeseen things that may come and they do come up that needs to be handle to keep everything running smooth and to help prevent the contract from being terminated.
  5. If the purchase transaction doesn’t close it can be devastating to all parties involved in the transaction. There is consist communication with the lender and the attorney.

It is the REALTOR®’s job in represent the buyer to accomplish all of the above and to do what’s best for the buyer and it doesn’t cost the buyer one penny.

Bottom line.... Get a REALTOR® to represent you, I course I would hope you choose me but whether you choose me or another REALTOR®, get yourself a REALTOR®, after all purchasing a home is not something you do every day, twice a year or even once a year. We do, it’s all we do every day, all day.

As for New Construction:

A common misconception when purchasing new construction is that you don’t need a

REALTOR®. Ask any sales agent working for the builder and the answer you'll get (guaranteed) is that you don't need a REALTOR®, they can take care of everything. This may be true but it doesn't get you personal representation that all buyers should expect and have.

A good question to ask is, "Who will represent me?" Now the answers come down to, "We will...." Think about it, these representatives are employed by and responsible to the builder. Why would someone believe that the potential for a "conflict of interest" doesn't exist?

Case in point, "Do I need an inspection?" The answers provided by the builder is, no, we inspect and do several reviews of the property before you take ownership and you have a "full one year warranty" that covers w, x, y, & z.

Any REALTOR® representing you will tell you that you should have a personal structural inspection conducted even with new construction. Some of the issues identified with our new construction inspections include: missing roof tile, black mold in the attic, sealed vents, faulty smoke detectors, wiring violations, foundation, structure issues, etc. These are the types of problems that the normal home owner may not identify for years beyond the warranty. Now who benefits from being told that an inspection is not necessary?

When buying new construction, having a REALTOR® that represents you personally is a huge benefit from negotiations, asking important questions, monitoring the building process, etc.  The choice is yours, but wouldn't it make sense to protect yourself with personal representation?

Also make sure your REALTOR® accompanies you on EVERY first visit of new builder viewings, as the builders will not take kindly if you view their models without your agent and you may lose your agents representation if you decide to purchase from them.
Choose an experienced REALTOR® when working with new home builders, because every builder is different and each situation is unique, you want someone on your side guiding you step by step through the process and making sure the builder is doing their part in the transaction.

One last comment: It is a common misconception that not using a REALTOR® when buying new construction will save you money. Builders have their fee to the REALTOR® budgeted separately from the house price. So it’s not costing you in the price of the house.

When a buyer does not use a Buyer agent (REALTOR®), the builder pays their sale represented a higher commission, pockets the saving or throws it into their marketing budget.

So instead of asking yourself, “Why should I use a REALTOR®?” the real question is,

“Why wouldn’t you hire a REALTOR®?” At no cost to you, hiring an agent will save you

time today and money tomorrow.

The decision is yours, I'd be honored for the chance to help you. Please call or e-mail me for an appointment that's easy and convenient for you. Thanks for stopping by. I'm looking forward to hearing from you.

Mundy Bringuier, Broker/REALTOR®

PS: Hablo Espanol